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Abstract

Septic complications represent frequent causes of morbidity in liver diseases and following hepatic operations. Most infections are caused by the individual own intestinal microflora. The intestinal microflora composition is important in physiological and pathophysiological processes in the human gastrointestinal tract, but their influence on liver in different situations is unclear. We therefore studied the effect of different Lactobacillus strains and a Bifidobacterium strain on the extent of liver injury, bacterial translocation and intestinal microflora in an acute liver injury model. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups: acute liver injury control, acute liver injury + B. animalis NM2, acute liver injury + L. acidophilus NMI, acute liver injury + L. rhamnosus ATCC 53103, and acute liver injury + L. rhamnosus DSM 6594 and L. plantarum DSM 9843. The bacteria were administered rectally daily for 8 days. Liver injury was induced on the 8th day by intraperitoneal injection of D-galactosamine (1.1 g/kg BW). Samples were collected 24 h after the liver injury. Liver enzymes and bilirubin serum levels, bacterial translocation (to arterial and portal blood, liver and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs)), and intestinal microflora were evaluated. L. acidophilus NM1; L. rhamnosus ATCC 53103, and L. rhamnosus DSM 6594 + L. plantarum DSM 9843 decreased bacterial translocation compared to the liver injury control group. B. animalis NM2 increased bacterial translocation to the mesenteric lymph nodes. The levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALAT) were significantly lower in the L. acidophilus, L. rhamnosus ATCC 53103, L. rhamnosus DSM 6594 + L. plantarum DSM 9843 groups compared to the liver injury group. The L. rhamnosus and L. rhamnosus + L. plantarum groups significantly reduced ALAT levels compared to the B. animalis group. All administered bacteria decreased the Enterobacteriaceae count in the cecum and colon. Administration of different lactobacilli and a Bifidobacterium strain in an acute liver injury rat model, has shown different effects on bacterial translocation and hepatocellular damage. L. acidophilus, L. rhamnosus, and L. rhamnosus + L. plantarum reduced bacterial translocation and hepatocellular damage. B. animalis NM2 increased bacterial translocation to the mesenteric lymph nodes and did not affect hepatocellular damage.

Research Insights

SupplementHealth OutcomeEffect TypeEffect Size
Lactobacillus rhamnosus DSM 6594Reduced Bacterial TranslocationBeneficial
Moderate
Lactobacillus rhamnosus DSM 6594Reduced Enterobacteriaceae CountsBeneficial
Moderate
Lactobacillus rhamnosus DSM 6594Reduced Hepatocellular DamageBeneficial
Large

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