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Abstract

The objective of this experiment was to test the hypothesis that the apparent ileal digestibility (AID) of AA, CP, and GE, the apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of CP and GE, and the apparent hindgut digestibility of CP and GE by growing pigs may be improved by supplementing diets with two direct-fed microbials (DFM) containing different Bacillus strains. Twenty-four growing barrows (initial BW: 22.69 ± 1.48 kg) that had a T-cannula installed in the distal ileum were individually housed and randomly allotted to a three diet, three period design with 24 pigs and three 21-d periods. There were eight pigs per diet in each period for a total of 24 observations per diet. Three diets that were based on corn, soybean meal, and distillers dried grains with solubles were formulated. The control diet contained no DFM, but two additional diets contained two different Bacillus strains (Bacillus amyloliquefaciens or Bacillus subtilis). Feed was provided in mash form in two daily meals at 0800 and 1600 hours. The initial 12 d of each period was the adaptation period to the diet. Fecal and urine samples were collected from days 13 to 18, and ileal digesta were collected for 8 h on days 20 and 21. Results indicated that there were no differences among diets in ATTD of CP, but the AID of CP was reduced (P < 0.05) for the B. subtilis diet compared with control and B. amyloliquefaciens diets. Therefore, the apparent hindgut digestibility of CP was greater (P < 0.005) in pigs fed the B. subtilis diet compared with the other diets. The AID of total indispensable, total dispensable, and total AA was greater (P < 0.05) in the B. amyloliquefaciens diet compared with the control diet. There were no differences among diets in ATTD of GE, but the AID of GE was greater for the B. amyloliquefaciens diet than for the control and the B. subtilis diets (P < 0.001). Therefore, the apparent hindgut digestibility of GE was less (P < 0.05) in the B. amyloliquefaciens diet compared with the other diets. The DE (DM basis) for the B. subtilis diet was greater (P < 0.05) compared with the control and the B. amyloliquefaciens diets. In conclusion, supplementation of Bacillus spp. to diets fed to growing pigs may increase the AID of AA and GE, but there appears to be differences among strains of Bacillus spp. in their impact on AA and energy digestibility.

Research Insights

SupplementHealth OutcomeEffect TypeEffect Size
Bacillus amyloliquefaciensImproved DigestibilityBeneficial
Large
Bacillus amyloliquefaciensImproved Digestibility of Amino AcidsBeneficial
Moderate

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