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Saccharomyces boulardii and Candida albicans experimental colonization of the murine gut.

  • 2011-05
  • Medical Mycology 49(4)
    • George Samonis
    • M. E. Falagas
    • M. E. Falagas
    • S. Lionakis
    • M. Ntaoukakis
    • D. Kofteridis
    • I. Ntalas
    • Sofia Maraki

Abstract

Saccharomyces boulardii has been and continues to be extensively used as a probiotic, with only rare associations with fungemia. This study evaluated the virulence of this yeast when given as a probiotic, and its role in preventing gastrointestinal (GI) colonization by Candida. Adult male Crl:CD1 (ICR) BR mice were given S. boulardii orally in three different doses or normal saline for 14 days. Stool cultures were performed at the time of discontinuation of yeast administration, as well as 1 and 2 weeks later. Gut colonization was proportional to the given dose but lasted only 1 week and no dissemination of the yeast was detected. S. boulardii was also given for 2 and 4 weeks to mice fed chow containing Candida albicans. S. boulardii in the gut did not affect Candida GI colonization. These findings suggest that oral administration of S. boulardii induces a substantial but short term increase of this yeast in the intestinal lumen and administration of the probiotic does not prevent subsequent GI colonization by C. albicans.

Research Insights

SupplementHealth OutcomeEffect TypeEffect Size
Saccharomyces boulardiiGut Colonization by Saccharomyces boulardiiNeutral
Small
Saccharomyces boulardiiPrevention of Candida albicans Gastrointestinal ColonizationNeutral
Small
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